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Agraria

 
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jabailo



Joined: 20 Mar 2006
Posts: 1273
Location: Kent (East Hill), WA

PostPosted: Fri Oct 17, 2008 2:21 pm    Post subject: Agraria Reply with quote

Here I define Agraria.

It is the next phase of housing.

Americans will move back to farms...minifarms.

These will be 2 acre plots with a large country house and enough growing room to feed a family of four with organic produce.

The family may hire a "gardener" to tend it for them.

They will use wind and solar to generate hydrogen.

WiMax connects them to all media and telecommunications.

Agraria takes us beyond Exurbia and decouples us from the urban center. It loosely couples us to an energy grid.
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brian-hansen
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Joined: 17 Mar 2006
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 17, 2008 3:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I strongly suggest you look into superstructgame.org. I'm in the process of writing about just this idea there. My name there is "empiricus" (I know, I should have gone all the way and named myself "pretencius").
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jabailo



Joined: 20 Mar 2006
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Location: Kent (East Hill), WA

PostPosted: Thu Oct 23, 2008 3:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Superstruct: I joined as mentioned elsewhere (jabailo).

Agraria: I'm seeing more evidence of this as a possible trend. I noticed banner ads for land in central Washington "released by the Government". The price is $29,000 for 40 acres -- this seems a steal based on current home prices in the Pacific Northwest.

http://www.liveatgrandview.com/

At that price, I could easily take on a plot and start building my "loosely coupled" home with hydrogen generators and solar panels. Or just set up a tent and camp there!
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jabailo



Joined: 20 Mar 2006
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Location: Kent (East Hill), WA

PostPosted: Thu Oct 30, 2008 8:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Locally generated power for Agraria:

http://money.cnn.com/2008/10/28/magazines/fortune/tech/gunther_fuelcell.fortune/?postversion=2008102923

Quote:
(Distributed) power to the people
The fuel cell business is coming of age, at last, led by United Technologies and FuelCell Energy.

The fundamental appeal of distributed fuel cells is that they are more efficient than the combination of central power plants and the grid; in other words, they can make more usable electricity from the same amount of fuel. This is partly because they can capture and use waste heat to heat water or to warm or cool buildings. It's also because as much as two-thirds of the energy produced by centralized power plants is lost to the atmosphere as waste heat or during the transmission process.

"You don't throw away 67 cents of every dollar, and that's what we're doing at a big power plant," says UTC's van Dokkum. What's more, because fuel cells are distributed, i.e., on the customer's site, the buyers don't have to worry about losing power.
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jabailo



Joined: 20 Mar 2006
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 14, 2008 6:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here's an interactive electoral map:

http://elections.nytimes.com/2008/results/president/explorer.html

Use the slider for population density.

You'll see that as density goes down, Republican votes go up and the reverse for Democrats!

Was the 2008 election really about the war between the Urbs and Agraria?

The crossover point where both Republicans and Democrats get equal shares is

1860 people per square mile.

There are 640 acres in a square mile.

So the crossover point is 1860/640 = 3 people per acre.

Agraria proposes 2 acre plots per family so there is some closeness...
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brian-hansen
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Joined: 17 Mar 2006
Posts: 712
Location: Oregon

PostPosted: Fri Nov 14, 2008 8:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes. I think you are expressing an essential element of the US political
landscape. We have two parties: the rural party and the urban party.
We just call them by different names.

I'd be interested if you posted where you get the 1860 figure.

Following your math, a family living at the "tipping point" would
have 6 members (3 people/acre * 2 acres/family). Based on
the last average household size figures I've heard, this would
be a large or extended family, 2-3 times the size of current
households.

Extending your logic, small "Agrarian" households would vote
"Rural", while larger families, or extended families would vote
"Urban". If family size stayed the same, "Agraria" would be
overwhelmingly "Rural".

Don't get me wrong. I recognize that this line of reasoning is
demonstrably fallacious. I just like following out the mathematical
implications to see what they suggest. In this case, it leads
me to ask how many people you think live within an average
"agrarian" household?
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jabailo



Joined: 20 Mar 2006
Posts: 1273
Location: Kent (East Hill), WA

PostPosted: Sat Nov 15, 2008 11:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
I'd be interested if you posted where you get the 1860 figure. I'd be interested if you posted where you get the 1860 figure. I'd be interested if you posted where you get the 1860 figure.


I moved the slider until the percent for Obama and McCain was even. That was 1860 pop per sq. mi.
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Time Clock



Joined: 11 Sep 2008
Posts: 47
Location: Vancouver, WA

PostPosted: Wed Nov 19, 2008 9:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

In this I assume "people" = voters? So kids or people who choose not to vote arent counted? Otherwise 3 people per acre sound like a small family, rather than 1.5 households.

Not a big difference, just curious
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jabailo



Joined: 20 Mar 2006
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Location: Kent (East Hill), WA

PostPosted: Sat Nov 22, 2008 9:59 am    Post subject: Powering Agraria Reply with quote

Don't like hydrogen?

Then go nukes...they're coming down in size and can provide more off grid power for small neighborhoods of 20,000:

Quote:
http://physicsworld.com/cws/article/news/36758

This nuclear reactor — or "battery" as the firm calls it — is not much larger than a hot-tub and could supply thermal energy at a rate of about 70 MW. That could be converted into about 27 MW of electricity, which would be enough to supply about 20,000 US households.

http://www.hyperionpowergeneration.com/

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jabailo



Joined: 20 Mar 2006
Posts: 1273
Location: Kent (East Hill), WA

PostPosted: Sat Nov 22, 2008 10:20 am    Post subject: Agraria SuperStruct Reply with quote

I don't know if I've ever posted the links here, but here they are for SuperStruct Agraria:

The SuperStruct:

Agraria
http://superstructgame.org/SuperstructView/438

The Discussion:

Unpacking Agraria
http://superstructgame.org/DiscussionView/372


The Stories:

Home, Sweet, Agraria
http://superstructgame.org/StoryView/635

A Day in the Life of An Agrarian Family
http://superstructgame.org/StoryView/685

Agraria Versus the United Urbs of America
http://superstructgame.org/StoryView/808
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jabailo



Joined: 20 Mar 2006
Posts: 1273
Location: Kent (East Hill), WA

PostPosted: Mon Dec 01, 2008 9:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

In some sense this is the admission that land and home costs are going to nil...homeless people are being moved into foreclosed homes...and no one is stopping them!

http://takebacktheland.blogspot.com/

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,459965,00.html
Quote:

Rameau is an activist who has been executing a bailout plan of his own around Miami's empty streets: He is helping homeless people illegally move into foreclosed homes.

"We're matching homeless people with people-less homes," he said with a grin.

Rameau and a group of like-minded advocates formed Take Back the Land, which also helps the new "tenants" with secondhand furniture, cleaning supplies and yard upkeep. So far, he has moved six families into foreclosed homes and has nine on a waiting list.
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jabailo



Joined: 20 Mar 2006
Posts: 1273
Location: Kent (East Hill), WA

PostPosted: Wed Dec 03, 2008 11:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Agraria may already be being built -- in Denmark!

http://www.cop15.dk/en/servicemenu/News/QueenMargretheToOpenHydrogenSupplyForLollandHouses.htm

Quote:
On 15 September, the village of Vestenskov on Lolland, the fourth largest island in Denmark, will take a step closer to becoming Denmark's first hydrogen community, when Queen Margrethe opens the hydrogen supply from a central electrolysis plant to five test houses, writes financial daily newspaper Børsen.

Each house has a hydrogen-powered fuel cell module installed, which will supply heat and electricity. The project is part of Lolland's aim to become a European role model for full-scale hydrogen technology implementation.


Here's a fact sheet:

http://www.h2-lolland.dk/mediafiles/1/other/hydrogen_engelsk_arm.pdf


This fellow wants the same in Australia:

http://www.thedaily.com.au/news/2008/dec/04/inventor-pushes-hydrogen-idea/

Quote:
The Sunshine Coast could be the site of Australia’s first hydrogen community if the council, university, industry and the community fully embrace the concept of developing a national model for sustainability here.

Describing the project as “executable yesterday’’, inventor Colin Salmond said the emission-free technology relied on our only truly sustainable resources – the sun, wind and hydrogen.
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jabailo



Joined: 20 Mar 2006
Posts: 1273
Location: Kent (East Hill), WA

PostPosted: Mon Dec 08, 2008 10:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The city de-densifies:

GM's Bust Turns Detroit Into Urban Prairie of Vacant-Lot Farms

http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601109&refer=home&sid=aMV8_J49diKs

Quote:
With enough abandoned lots to fill the city of San Francisco, Motown is 138 square miles divided between expanses of decay and emptiness and tracts of still-functioning communities and commercial areas. Close to six barren acres of an estimated 17,000 have already been turned into 500 ``mini- farms,'' demonstrating the lengths to which planners will go to make land productive.
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jabailo



Joined: 20 Mar 2006
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Location: Kent (East Hill), WA

PostPosted: Thu Dec 11, 2008 7:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fresh water for Agraria.

http://www.newsweek.com/id/173358

Quote:
Originally envisioned as an antidote to the shortage of clean drinking water in the world, the WaterMill has the look of a futuristic air conditioner and the ability to condense, filter and sterilize water for about 3 cents per quart.

At $1,299, the 45-pound device doesn't come cheap, and it is neither the first nor the biggest machine to enter the fast-growing field of atmospheric water generators. But by targeting individual households with a self-cleaning, environmentally friendly alternative to bottled water, Kelowna, British Columbia-based Element Four is hoping its WaterMill will become the new must-have appliance of 2009.
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jabailo



Joined: 20 Mar 2006
Posts: 1273
Location: Kent (East Hill), WA

PostPosted: Tue Dec 16, 2008 2:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601109&sid=a2c4a3o81mM0&refer=exclusive

China Grads Follow Mao Path to Country, Now to Spur Development

Quote:
Dec. 16 (Bloomberg) -- Liu Hao, who graduated in June with a degree in manufacturing from a Beijing technical school, found a job he loves -- in a village of 288 people surrounded by peach orchards.

“Even the villagers think it’s surprising,” he says. “They say, ‘what’s a college graduate doing coming here?’”
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jabailo



Joined: 20 Mar 2006
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Location: Kent (East Hill), WA

PostPosted: Fri Sep 25, 2009 4:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

general U.S. migration patterns now are changing

http://www.miller-mccune.com/culture_society/Go-East-Young-Man-1489?ref=patrick.net

Quote:
• There is a strong net flow of people from large metro areas to rural areas, towns and cities of around 300,000; this group tends to have higher incomes.
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jabailo



Joined: 20 Mar 2006
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PostPosted: Wed Dec 09, 2009 10:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://online.wsj.com/article_email/SB10001424052748703735004574571742502599748-lMyQjAxMDA5MDAwMzEwNDMyWj.html?source=patrick.net

Green Acres Is the Place to Be
The Recession Is Inspiring More Young Families and Singles to Head Back to the Country


Quote:
Kathryn O'Shea-Evans, a 25-year-old freelance writer, moved from Portland, Ore., to New York on Dec. 31, 2006. When the economy began floundering, she was frugal—living in a $650-a-month boarding-house room, buying clothing in resale shops, and socking away part of each paycheck.

Then, this past August, she flew to Montana to look at a place to invest those savings: a $12,000, 12-acre parcel of land.
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jabailo



Joined: 20 Mar 2006
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Location: Kent (East Hill), WA

PostPosted: Tue Feb 23, 2010 11:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Number of farms in state grows, report finds.

http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/localnews/2011166572_farmreport24m.html

Quote:
The numbers may be surprising:

• The number of farms in Washington rose 6 percent between 2000 and 2008 — with the upward trajectory steeper in the last two of those years. That means the state has about the same number of farms as it did in 1970, though the total acreage in farming has shrunk.

• Ninety percent of the farms are owned by individuals or families.

• There has been an increase in local food processors in the last few years, which helps lower transportation costs for small farmers, and thus helps keep agriculture economically viable.

• Net farm income is higher than it's been in nearly 20 years, rising 192 percent since a low in 1999, the report states.

• The number of farmers markets has more than doubled since 1998.
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jabailo



Joined: 20 Mar 2006
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 20, 2010 11:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Agraria is agraria is agraria...


The Broken Society
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/03/19/opinion/19brooks.html?ref=opinion

Quote:
To create a civil state, Blond would reduce the power of senior government officials and widen the discretion of front-line civil servants, the people actually working in neighborhoods. He would decentralize power, giving more budget authority to the smallest units of government. He would funnel more services through charities. He would increase investments in infrastructure, so that more places could be vibrant economic hubs. He would rebuild the “village college” so that universities would be more intertwined with the towns around them.
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jabailo



Joined: 20 Mar 2006
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 29, 2010 11:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I was browsing the Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910. Reading the stats for population the division of urban and rural was roughly 50/50...with rural still leading by a small amount.

http://www.archive.org/stream/thirteenthcensus00unitrich#page/56/mode/1up

I wonder if we'll soon get back to that balance...
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jabailo



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PostPosted: Sun Jul 25, 2010 9:51 pm    Post subject: Homesteads -- Cities giving away free land! Reply with quote

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/26/us/26revenue.html?src=mv

Quote:
The calculus is simple, if counterintuitive: hand out city land now to ensure property tax revenues in the future
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jabailo



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PostPosted: Fri Feb 01, 2013 11:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Agritopia® community is something of a modern day village set within the urban fabric of the Phoenix metro area. The name says it all: Agritopia® is about preserving urban agriculture and integrating it into the most neighborly, well-designed community possible. It is a principle-driven development that puts people and relationships ahead of money and trendiness.


http://agritopia.com/story-history/
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jabailo



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PostPosted: Tue Mar 19, 2013 12:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ruralisation – integrating settlements and agriculture to provide sustainability

http://www.holon.se/folke/lectures/Ruralisation-filer/v3_document.htm


Idea for the future: Ruralization

Quote:
As discussed here in the “Our Agriculture Future” posting and in full detail elsewhere on the Internet, Industrialized Agriculture is not a sustainable enterprise. It is heavily dependent on vast quantities of energy to turn crops into food and results in a linear flow in nutrients from the fields to the cities. The further away those cities are from their food supplies, the worse the energy and nutrient equations will be. By depopulating the large urban areas and increasing the number of self-sufficient rural settlements, we can significantly reduce the amount of energy required to sustain our existence. With intelligent planning, these rural settlements could be arranged on existing or newly constructed transportation links, permitting easy travel between the individual communities and the remainder of the urban area. The urban area itself would be made over, incorporating areas within the former city for agricultural production for its own needs.




http://unplanning.blogspot.com/2005/02/idea-for-future-ruralization.html
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jabailo



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PostPosted: Sat Sep 28, 2013 7:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The End of Cities: The Coming ‘Great Rural Migration’

The more widespread the Internet becomes, the less necessary cities become. The Internet drastically diminishes the advantages that urban living once provided, while the disadvantages of urban living remain the same. Thus, the 21st may be poised to see a Great Rural Migration.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/stephen-estes/internet-age_b_1914950.html
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